Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative – Key Accomplishments & Highlights

The team working on the Agile Alliance Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative has been working steadily over the last six months and we have now published a draft Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

Source: Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative – Key Accomplishments & Highlights

40 Agile Methods Goes Viral

Since first running the “40 Agile Methods in 40 Minutes” talk in 2014, the sketch note graphic that Lynne Cazaly created as part of the talk has ended up in numerous articles, presentations and in multiple languages.

Here are the ones that I am aware of:

Steve Denning has used the graphic numerous times in his articles on Forbes

Explaining Agile

… Yet what exactly is Agile? How do you explain Agile when there are more than forty different variants of Agile, as depicted in this graphic by Australian designer Lynne Cazaly… And what about all those Agile practices? There are more than 70 different Agile practices. Even the Agile Manifesto, with its four values and twelve principles can be a cognitive stretch for newcomers. How on earth can you explain such a bewildering blizzard of seemingly different ideas?

Understanding Fake Agile

… There is also Agile in the sense of the various Agile brands promoted by consultants and trainers, of which there are hundreds. These are multiple variants of the same underlying idea of Agile. Yet often there is an insistence on using particular terms and specific named processes, which are defined in this way for the commercial purpose of distinguishing their offering from competing consultants and trainers. The result is mass confusion as shown in the diagram below.

What Is Agile? The Four Essential Elements

… For one thing, many different flavors of Agile have been disseminated by advocates, as shown in the figure below. These variants were issued with the best intentions. But in the resulting cacophony, it is easy to lose sight of what is essential to Agile. And it’s even easier for critics to conclude that perhaps Agile is no more than noise and confusion.

Why Finding The Real Meaning Of Agile Is Hard

“I talked to 50+ leaders and consultants about what ‘agile’ means,” the legendary professor of management science at the Stanford Engineering School, Robert I. Sutton, wrote on Twitter late last week. “Read 10+ books. I agree with many principles and grasped it when it focused on software. I am now confused. It has become a huge tent with varied jargon monoxide. Consider this graphic via @stevedenning.”

The Five Biggest Challenges Facing Agile

… Today there are multiple versions of what is meant by Agile…

Other references

Flow Framework — a fad, or here to stay? – Karsh Kunwar

Agile methods and frameworks are a dime a dozen (see below), with more methods & frameworks sprouting into existence all the time. Therefore, when I first heard of the new kid on the block — Flow Framework, I was both curious and skeptical.

Agile software development at a glance – Axon Active

When we speak of Agile methodologies, we speak of a way of working that entails a range of widely-adopted lightweight frameworks and methods. Not surprisingly, they include more than 40 Agile methods (see below). The most popular are Scrum, XP, Crystal, among others, whose inventions dated from the early 1940s to the 1990s even before the term “Agile” was coined.

Transforming Software Delivery – Roman Dumiak

OnAgile2017 – the Agile Alliance even used it for a conference, and yet the talk was never accepted in the USA!

Battle of the Frameworks: Choosing Agile Approaches in Government Project – Agile Government Leadership

Julien Karoubi – LinkedIn – it even attracted a post in French

“Les coachs agiles sont dogmatiques…” 👺

Il y a une différence entre donner un conseil, un avis, une préférence et forcer quelqu’un ! 🤗

Chacun peut avoir ses habitudes et ses références.

Historiquement, l’organisation du travail n’etait pas discutable dans l’entreprise.🤐

Plutôt séquentielle, plutôt hiérarchique, plutôt comme à l’usine (spécialisation et standardisation), plutôt pas le choix…😑

Désormais on a ➕ de choix, PRÉDICTIF ou ADAPTATIF, avec ou sans frameworks, avec beaucoup de possibilités au niveau des concepts.🎁

Mais on ne force personne ! 🕊

Offrir des choix, des orientations avec des arguments, fait aussi parti de ce métier :

https://lnkd.in/dCND5sm

Tout n’est pas égal à tout 🤔

Oui il y a des avancées, des plébiscites, des effets d’annonce, de l’excitation, de la naïveté des débuts, de l’ouverture, mais surtout de l’espoir.🌞

Plus de 40 méthodes, ce n’est pas une mauvaise nouvelle. 🤷‍♂️

Voici les slides :
https://lnkd.in/e3tzUY5

Voici la vidéo :
https://lnkd.in/eVuF–N

Thks Craig Smith

Ceux qui empêche la réflexion, le choix, l’expression et l’argumentation, j’ai une pensée émue pour vous 😘

 

 

 

 

 

Episode 189: The Alistair Cockburn Fan Club with Martin Kearns

The Agile Revolution Podcast

Tony and Craig are at Agile Australia in Melbourne and they (finally) catch up with Martin Kearns, the Chief Digital Officer at Innodev and co-organiser of Scrum Australia, and they chat about:

  • Alistair Cockburn gets mentioned at around the 2:30 minute mark, and Martin was responsible for first bringing him to Australia
  • Being coached is being open to an experience you aren’t controlling
  • Certified Agile Leadership
  • Agile is always going to hurt, need to prepare for pain and enjoy it
  • Australia 2030: Prosperity through Innovation – need to understand the environmental factors that are forcing Agility into organisations
  • Knowledge of customers is more superior than ever before – due to education and social intelligence (Target inappropriate clothing for children)
  • VUCA is here to stay – accept that you need to listen
  • Australia Post is a good agile example organisation – reinvented themselves through identity services, travel…

View original post 26 more words

Episode 188: Doing Agile Right with Steve Berez & Tony Christensen

The Agile Revolution Podcast

Tony and Craig catch up with Tony Christensen and Steve Berez, co-author of “Doing Agile Right: Transformation Without Chaos” as well as from Bain & Company and they chat about:

  • Saw a lot of companies doing agile wrong and a lot of pain suffering and probably worse off than when they started – book is to try to share learning and get agile on the right track
  • The conditions for agile to flourish need to change, particularly beyond team level
  • RBS – one of the key impediments was funding, changed to funding persistent teams
  • Most organisations have a dissatisfaction with their financial process – need to have an honest conversation around the pain points of trust and process and seeing the promise of early return
  • Bosch – were not innovating as quickly as they needed to, now using Agile for product design, manufacturing process and supply change…

View original post 163 more words

Episode 187: Domain Driven Yak Symmathesy with Jessica Kerr

The Agile Revolution Podcast

 

Tony and Craig are at YOW! Conference in Brisbane and chat to Jessica Kerr, software developer, consultant and symmathecist (look it up or listen to the podcast) and apart from our first live podcast sneeze they talk about:

 
  • YOW! 2018 keynote “The Origins of Opera and the Future of Programming
  • YOW! 2018 talk “Shaving the Golden Yak
  • Great teams make great people – if you want to become great as a developer, focus on the team
  • You can’t document what is obvious to you – whenever you say the word obviously, replace it with “I cant explain it, but…”
  • Yak shaving – all the tasks that you do that get in the way of your work
  • If you are an agile person but you wish agile had more code in it – go to the Domain Driven Design community
  • We need to embrace complexity…

View original post 34 more words

Digital Summit 2020 – Agility Accelerator Workshop

Digital Summit 2020

My workshop with Julian Smith (no relation) from the DTA Digital Summit 2020 called “Agility Accelerator” is available on Slideshare.

Today ‘agile’ is no longer just a buzzword. From building spacecraft to manufacturing, some of the most complex and largest organisations in the world are using agile ways of working to deliver better outcomes, respond to change, improve quality, foster more productive and happier teams, and reduce risk.

This hands-on and interactive session is aimed at helping public sector organisations build capability to support agile ways of working, from policy development through to service design and delivery.

Belle Hogg from the DTA did an amazing job of capturing a visual scribe of the workshop and managed to capture my headset, glasses and lack of hair a little too well!

Identifying a Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

Agile_Alliance_Logo_Color-pngThe Agile Alliance Agile Coaching Ethics initiative is developing a code of ethical conduct to raise coaching standards in Agile coaching and amplify the value of the profession.

Source: Identifying a Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

The Big Tent of Agility

This post originally appeared on the SoftEd website.

One of the advantages of an Agile way of working is the fact that you can inspect and adapt and find the best tool or practice for the job. Unfortunately, though, when you are learning or looking for guidance, the myriad of frameworks and techniques can make the transformation to a new way of working seem very daunting.  It is therefore no surprise that frameworks that promise to offer a way to make sense of the complexity continue to rise in popularity in organisations all over the world.

If we go back to the roots of Agility and the creation of the Manifesto for Agile Software Development back in 2001, it was a meeting of the people who were the creators of the key approaches and practices at that time – Scrum, Extreme Programming, DSDM, Crystal and Adaptive Software Development amongst others. The key to the Manifesto was that it was written to be framework (and organisation) agnostic and that it captured the key values and principles of agility, to the extent that it is still universally agreed that this document is both the definition and core of Agile. Even the newer interpretations of the basics, such as Modern Agile and Heart of Agile, still borrow heavily on the core.

When I started my Agile journey in the early 2000’s we were still inventing a lot of the practices that we take for granted today. My early experiences were mostly a hybrid of Extreme Programming and Scrum, with a mix of other practices built in and finding the tool for the job and the team at the time. To me, Agile has always been about the core values and principles with a large umbrella of practices and frameworks underneath it. This doesn’t mean that following a framework like Scrum is wrong, it’s just knowing when something more or different is required. This is exactly what led to scaling approaches like LeSS, Scrum At Scale and SAFe and even for Ken Schwaber (one of the creators of Scrum) to define the term “Scrum And“.

One of the great things about Agile and its community is it is a place where ideas can be tried and shared. The Agile Alliance, the non-profit organisation formed out of the Agile Manifesto to promote and bring together the Agile community (of which I am proud to be an active member and current board member and secretary) refers to this as the “the big tent” – a place where any person of idea that subscribes to the values and principles is welcome. This big tent or umbrella was one of inspirations for a conference talk I gave a few years ago called “40 Agile Methods in 40 Minutes” – the visualisation of which has been used widely in the community ever since.

This big tent approach is one of the core reasons I was drawn to working with SoftEd, initially over 10 years ago as a client and customer, then later as a contract trainer and in more recent years as the Global Agility Lead. As one of the world’s leading ICAgile course providers, the suite of world quality courses are based on teaching the “big tent” of agility with a focus on giving attendees the best tools and techniques they need to be successful. The same approach applies to coaching engagements where the focus is on capability uplift and successful outcomes.

There is a myriad of techniques and practices and ways to get support on your Agile journey. If you are looking for training or coaching support that puts a focus on getting the right outcomes rather than a strict adherence to a framework, then make sure you check out the range services that SoftEd has to offer.

Episode 186: Managing the Unmanageable with Ron Lichty

The Agile Revolution Podcast

Craig fires some questions at Ron Lichty, co-author of “Managing the Unmanageable” and the “Study of Product Team Performance“:

  • Author of machine Language programming books “Programming the Apple IIGS in Assembly Language” and “Programming the 65816
  • Managing the Finder team at Apple – hired for stellar C++ coding ability and customer empathy
  • Software development is a team sport – including QA, a dedicated product manager / product owner and designers
  • After Dark and Flying Toasters at Berkeley Systems
  • “Managing the Unmnageable” is 9 chapters and around 300 rules of thumb and nuggets of wisdom (the creamy centre), the tools used to manage software development teams plus the authors own insights
  • There were very few books (7 at the time) on managing software developers (unlike project management and agile)
  • Fred Brooks – “The Mythical Man-Month
  • Situational Leadership – opens your…

View original post 220 more words