Episode 149: Continuous Delivery with Dave Farley

The Agile Revolution Podcast

Craig, Tony and honorary Revolutionist Pete Sellars are at YOW! Conference and sit down with Dave Farley, co-author of “Continuous Delivery” and they chat about the following

  • There are anti-patterns with doing XP at scale, continuous delivery was born from the learnings from that
  • Continuous delivery is just extending continuous integration to more of the software development practice (and continuous integration requires test driven development)
  • Continuous delivery works because it is the application of the scientific method to software development
  • If you work in an iterative, imperative, experimental way and you take continuous learning seriously and take cycle time as a serious measurement you will naturally drive out agile, lean, systems theory and DevOps
  • YOW! 2016 presentation “The Rationale for Continuous Delivery
  • Most common two ways to introduce continuous delivery to your organisation – need to get cover from senior management to make change or…

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YOW! Hong Kong / Singapore 2017 – Agile Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay

My presentation from YOW! Hong Kong 2017 and YOW! Singapore 2017 called “Agile Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay” is available on Slideshare.

When you look for inspiration in the Agile Coaching community, the name Gordon Ramsay is probably not the first name to come to mind. He has been known to be belligerent, condescending and downright rude, but underneath this brute facade is a treasure trove of skills and talents that influence change.

In this presentation we will draw insights from his ‘Kitchen Nightmare’ escapades and draw parallels with how much his work aligns with that of an Agile Coach and the goal to successfully drive change and introduce a number of models and techniques that are indispensable in the coaching toolkit.

Here are some tweets and feedback from the talk:

Episode 132: Usability Made Easy with Steve Krug

The Agile Revolution Podcast

Tony, Craig and Renee are at Agile Australia and catch up with Steve Krug and talk usability and along the way try to figure out whether Tony is lean, agile or just old…

  • Don’t Make Me Think” book, now in 3rd edition
  • Agile Australia keynote “You’re not doing usability testing? Are you…nuts?
  • need to start doing usability early, to find issues early and have time to fix it
  • Laura Klein’s book “UX For Lean Startups” is a good book on lean
  • issues with lean from a usability perspective is failure and disruption
  • usability is a user advocate role
  • cubicle test – draw a paper prototype and ask the person in the next cubicle to fill it out and observe the issues
  • CX is basically UX owned by marketing!
  • UX is design where usability is more about testing
  • start by taking to customers then do regularly…

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Inside the Valpak Manufacturing Centre

valpak_logoLast week I was lucky enough to be part of a tour through the Valpak Manufacturing Centre in St. Petersburg, Florida. Completely automated and lean, it is an excellent example of lean processes and continuous learning.

I could not take pictures in the facility, but the following official video gives an good overview of Valpak and the manufacturing centre.

Some of the key items:

  • The factory is built 18 feet above sea level and built to withstand category 4 hurricanes
  • They reframed the problem – instead of stuffing coupons into an envelope they build the envelope around the coupons
  • They etch their own printing plates and recycle the aluminium afterwards
  • Failover is built into the system – such as two print heads per press so that they can change the plates without stopping the printing
  • Loose paper is sucked off the factory floor by vaccuums
  • The coupons are wound onto rolls and then stored temporarily until needed for collation – these are also buffers for the process
  • Automated robots move the rolls around, they are smart enough to recharge themselves as well
  • The collation process is ordered to ensure they get the lowest postal prices, right down to the order the pallets are loaded onto the truck
  • The process used to take 4 days and now is about 4 hours
  • There are very few humans on the factory floor – just highly skilled workers for operations and machine repair
  • Continuous learning and improvement – can now insert different offers for different households for example

 

Opinion: What 2017 Has in Store for Culture & Methods

InfoQWe polled the InfoQ Culture & Methods editors for their takes on what 2017 has in store for the technology industry, what are the trends which we see coming to the fore and what the implications will be for organizations around the globe.

Source: Opinion: What 2017 Has in Store for Culture & Methods

Episode 123: Some Principles of Lean and Product Development Flow with Don Reinertsen

The Agile Revolution Podcast

8265695783_995186c1ce_hCraig and Tony are at YOW! Conference and are privileged to spend some time with Don Reinertsen, who is considered one of the leading thinkers in the field of lean product development and author of numerous books including “Principles of Product Development Flow”

  • Principles of Product Development Flow” book and why there is a waterfall on the front
  • Japanese Manufacturing Techniques was the name before it was rebranded as Lean Manufacturing
  • Taiichi Ohno, the father of the Toyota Production System, hated math and thus preferred to sit on the factory floor and tweak processes, hence it was not a theory driven approach but rather empirically driven
  • Need to understand why things work so you can transfer it to other domains, a big shortcoming in lean manufacturing is that they don’t have much of a mathematical view on what they are doing
  • You can use magic in manufacturing…

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Agile Brisbane – Agile Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay

AgileBrisbaneMy presentation from the Agile Brisbane meetup called “Agile Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay” is available on Slideshare.

When you look for inspiration in the Agile Coaching community, the name Gordon Ramsay is probably not the first name to come to mind. He has been known to be belligerent, condescending and downright rude, but underneath this brute facade is a treasure trove of skills and talents that influence change.

In this presentation we will draw insights from his ‘Kitchen Nightmare’ escapades and draw parallels with how much his work aligns with that of an Agile Coach and the goal to successfully drive change and introduce a number of models and techniques that are indispensable in the coaching toolkit.

Some pictures:

Here are some tweets and feedback from the talk:

First time to Agile meetup, exceeded expectation, will be back – Steve S

Awesome presentation. Thanks very much Craig! – Emi

This was my first Agile meetup. A great presentation and a well run event. – David Wilkinson

Excellent presentation. Some great reminders! – BronwynSC

This was my first time and it was a great presentation – Arthur

Always a pleasure hearing you speak Craig. I’ll be sharing your slides with the Elabor8 team! – Ryan McKergow

Thanks for a great presentation – Rob Lawes

 

 

Agile 2016 – Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay

Agile2016-SPEAKER-300x250My presentation from Agile 2016 called “Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay” is available on Slideshare.

When you look for inspiration in the Agile Coaching community, the name Gordon Ramsay is probably not the first name to come to mind. He has been known to be belligerent, condescending and downright rude, but underneath this brute facade is a treasure trove of skills and talents that influence change.

In this presentation we will draw insights from his ‘Kitchen Nightmare’ escapades and draw parallels with how much his work aligns with that of an Agile Coach and the goal to successfully drive change and introduce a number of models and techniques that are indispensable in the coaching toolkit.

Learning Outcomes:

Understand the difference between coaching, advising and mentoring

Approaches to having confronting coaching conversations

Dealing with denial and unengaged staff

The criticality of a burning platform to invoke change

Why it is important to have coaches as experts

Agile coaching is more than the GROW model (or other coaching models)

It was extremely disappointing that my partner in crime on this talk Renee Troughton could not make the trip to Atlanta to deliver this with me, I certainly hope I did her parts of the talk justice.

Here are a few of the tweets from the talk:

 

Agile Australia 2016 – Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay

Agile-Australia-2016-Resources-Badge-Speaker-600x100pxMy presentation with Renee Troughton from Agile Australia 2016 called “Coaching Nightmares: Lessons We Can Learn From Gordon Ramsay” is available on Slideshare.

When you look for inspiration in the Agile coaching community, the name Gordon Ramsay is probably not the first name to come to mind. He has been known to be belligerent, condescending and downright rude, but underneath this brute facade is a treasure trove of skills and talents that influence change.

In this presentation we will draw insights from Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares escapades and explore parallels with how much his work aligns with that of an Agile Coach and the goal to successfully drive change. We will introduce a number of models and techniques that are indispensable in the coaching toolkit.

Here are some of the live tweets from the talk:

 

 

Vale Agile Collaborator and Leader Jean Tabaka

InfoQThe Agile community has lost a thought leader, influencer and friend, Jean Tabaka, who passed away earlier this week. She was best known through her work as an Agile Fellow at CA Technologies (formerly Rally Software) and author of the book ‘Collaboration Explained: Facilitation Skills for Software Product Leaders’.

JeanTabakaSource: Vale Agile Collaborator and Leader Jean Tabaka