Online presence of Craig Smith — Agile Coach & IT Professional in Australia

Originally posted on The Agile Revolution:

alanbustamanteAt Agile 2013 in Nashville on a park bench, in a garden, near a waterfall that is ever present, Craig catches up with Alan Bustamante to talk about his Agile expedition. Along the way they chat about:

  • the enormity of the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville and the average weather outside
  • the use case approach in the Rational Unified Process (RUP) and how it set the scene for Scrum and Agile
  • bringing architects along for the Agile journey
  • an initial lure for Agile – “the pressure of letting the team down is greater than staying resistant”
  • Agile Cincinnati and the take up in Cincinatti and Colombus
  • the need to “get back to making work fun and building relationships”
  • Alan’s work at Seapine Software and “The Agile Expedition” book
  • Alan’s conference tip: make it a goal to meet at least one person and get to know them
  • Advice: “there are bigger…

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ExFATI run a MacBook Pro Retina (late 2013) and on my 512GB hard drive I have 3 partitions

  • 150GB Mac OSX partition (currently running Mavericks)
  • 150GB Windows 8.1 partition (via Bootcamp)
  • 200GB data parition (formatted with ExFAT)

I chose an ExFAT partition so I could read and write to the data partition from either the OSX or the Windows partition as I use each operating system a similar amount. I had planned to install VMWare fusion at some point to avoid the dual boot, but haven’t sone so due to some licencing issues with some software on my Windows partition that I uncovered in the trial.

Recently I was travelling and was doing some editing for my podcast on the plane. I also inadvertantly moved and deleted some files. The next morning I woke up to deliver a workshop to find that my data partition was missing. Windows reported that the drive needed to be formatted and Mac OSX reported that the drive was corrupt. On either operating system, the relevant disk utilities were unable to fix the issue.

It appears that ExFAT partitions are not well supported in OSX, particularly if you delete files. Unfortunately due to Windows and Mac not playing nicely from a read/write perspective, neither HFS or NTFS are an option for this drive either.

A bunch of articles seemed to indicate that CHKDSK /F on the volume should fix it, but given the fact that Windows was reporting the partition needed to be formatted, this fix was not valid in this circumstance. After searching the web for numerous reports and fixes (and tearing my hair out with worry in the process), I finally stumbled on an article that led to a simple solution of a terminal command:

fsck_exfat -d disk0s4

where diskos4 is your ExFAT partition.

It then asks:

Main boot region needs to be updated. Yes/No?

to which you reply Yes. You can then run repair in the OSX Disk Utility and the partition should be restored!

Easy fix, but baffles me why ExFAT and NTFS support is so bad on Mac OSX.

Originally posted on The Agile Revolution:

lynnecazalyLive at Agile Australia 2014, Craig and Renee talk all things visual with one of Australia’s top visual facilitators, Lynne Cazaly:

  • What is Visual Facilitation and Graphic Recording
  • You can use visuals even if you can’t draw
  • Lynne’s story into Visual Facilitation
  • How to anchor emphasized words
  • The benefit of a chisel tip
  • The girl who played with paper presentation at Agile Australia 2014
  • Tools that are useful – the good ol’ finger, brushes, procreate, sketches, inkflow, sketchclub
  • The benefit of bringing people up to speed with visual stories
  • To split or not to split – facilitation and the visual scribe
  • Turning your back on the room – a no go or a load of tripe?
  • Preparation – to spend time upfront or not, using templates
  • Facilitation through lean coffee wall (gather, sort, do)
  • Using visuals to engage and distill information for future visibility
  • Lynne’s next course in Melbourne…

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Originally posted on The Agile Revolution:

AgileCoachTony asks a philisophical question , whilst Renee harnesses her nineties pop star – Ice Ice Baby and Craig marvels at Tony’s  cool intro – probably the coolest intro he’s done since the eighties.

The Agile Revolution – 73 (54.21)

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Outlook2010The auto complete cache in Outlook remembers all of the addresses that you have emailed and auto completes them when you enter an email address into the To: (or CC: or BCC:) field in Outlook. There are numerous fixes around on the web, but this one sorted the issue for me today on a stubborn Windows 7 machine with Outlook 2010 installed (with Google App Sync).

  1. Close Outlook and go to %localappdata%\Microsoft\Outlook\ and rename RoamCache to old_RoamCache
  2. Restart Outlook using the command line switch /cleanautocompletecache (“C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office14\Outlook.exe” /cleanautocompletecache). This will rebuild the autocomplete cache.

These steps are based on an article at Spiceworks here: http://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/show/16443-repair-autocomplete-cache-in-outlook-2010. The second step was missing in the official Microsoft article.

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 11,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 4 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

AgileEncore2013My presentation from the Agile Encore 2013 conference called “Visual Management: Leading With What You Can See” is available on Slideshare.

Renee Troughton was unfortunately unable to join me to present this reprise of the talk we presented together at Agile Australia 2013.

Using task boards or story walls is a key Agile practice, but are you making the most of it? Visual Management is more than just putting cards on a wall, it is a growing style of management that focuses on managing work only by what you can see rather than reports or paper being shuffled around. Visual Management allows you to understand the constraints in the system, mitigate risks before they become issues, report on progress from the micro to the macro. Visual Management can also be used to demonstrate to customers and clients where the work they care about is at. This presentation is all about taking the management of your work to the next stage of transparency. Discover:

* How to identify when your story wall isn’t telling you everything and how to adjust it
* What the three different types of story walls are and which one is more suitable to certain circumstances
* Different ways to visualise your product backlogWhy queue columns and limiting work in progress is so important regardless of whether you are using Scrum or Kanban
* How symbols and tokens can be used to give more information
* What else can you use other than story walls to visualise information
* How to ingrain Visual Management into both the team and management structures of your organisation
* Visualising Your Quality, Testing and Team
* What is systemic flow mapping and why is it important

Unfortunately the talk was interrupted about three-quarters of the way through by a rogue video conference call into the auditorium. My attempt to try and answer questions why people were trying to fix the problem were interrupted by audio coming through the call. We soldiered on – but it interrupted the flow.

And here are some feedback from the feedback forms – much appreciated!

  • Lots of ideas
  • Very informative with real world examples
  • Delivered as per advertised. Was relevant and interesting to listen to. Some great take outs
  • More relevant to where we are as an organisation
  • Big wall
  • Most applicable as I am a newbie
  • Kept the audience engaged from start to finish
  • The task based techniques most relevant
  • Gave more understanding of how to do better Agile

 

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