Episode 64: Interstate 40 East with Nick Muldoon

The Agile Revolution Podcast

Nick-CraigOn a road trip to Agile 2013 from Dallas to Nashville, Craig chats to Nick Muldoon while cruising in a Chevy Equinox eastbound on Interstate 40 between Memphis and Nashville. Nick is an Agile Coach at Twitter and formerly the Product manager for GreenHopper at Atlassian and whilst doing 65 miles an hour they chat about:

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Episode 57: No, No, Noooo!

The Agile Revolution Podcast

NoTony, Renee and Craig meet in sunny suburban Sandgate and have an intense debate about the world of Agile while dealing with the 4:01 to Shorncliffe and beeping out Tony’s references to seagulls and respect.

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Speak Social? First Learn Social!

Further to my Twitter Twaining post the other day, a colleague posted a link to this slide deck by Antony Mayfield from iCrossing on our internal Yammer network. What I really like is the literacy angle that suggests that we need to learn to read and write again and that we need to learn by doing (good examples that I left in the summary of my post).

Twitter Twaining

I delivered some rather impromptu and unprepared training last week for some colleagues on their use of Twitter in the Enterprise. Amongst the millions of training threads, I found a very good (but also a very customer specific) Tweetcamp presentation.

So using this slide deck as a guide, I delivered the following training points:

Twitter vs Facebook

  • Facebook is primarily about connections with your friends and your social connections (photos, walls, games, applications, gifts)
  • Facebook has become more like Twitter in recent releases by asking the question “what is on your mind”?
  • Twitter can be viewed more about your connection with people who have common interests (although many of them are your friends)
  • Twitter is less rich out of the box
  • Following somebody on Twitter you are following the thoughts of the whole person, not just the ideas you might best know them for

Twitter vs Blogs

  • Twitter is what is referred to as micro-blogging
  • Twitter is limited to 140 characters, so is a snapshot of the authors thoughts
  • Blogs provide a facility for more in-depth thoughts, analysis and reporting
  • If summarising an event, use Twitter to throw out live snippets, thoughts and quotes and blog after the event to review and synthesise in greater detail
  • Twitter is a good way to advertise new posts to your blog

Twitter vs Email

  • There is no expectation to read and/or respond to everything on Twitter. You dive in and out of the stream as it suits you and take notice of as much or as little as makes sense
  • Twitter conversations are open and discoverable to all
  • Direct messages can be used somewhat like email for a point to point conversation
  • Twitter allows you to unfollow or block “spammers”
  • Email is still much better for more “personal” messages

Why Do I Care?

  • Twitter usage is growing exponentially, on the back of big celebrity support of people such as Oprah and Ellen as well as traditional media such as CNN and 60 Minutes
  • Twitter is still has a much smaller user base than Facebook
  • Social media like Twitter is here to stay, but you need to be ready for the next thing if and when it comes along.

Going Viral

  • Using these tools may make you go viral. Many traditional media outlets have attempted this, very few are successful, but those that are successful are extremely successful.
  • You Tube is currently the platform that is feeding virality

Twitter vs Yammer

  • Yammer is Twitter for the enterprise, posts are blocked to those that can sign up with an email on your domain
  • Can dual post to Yammer and Twitter by setting up your Twitter account in the Yammer settings and adding the #yam tag to the end of your posts
  • Many other services allow you to dual tweet. Facebook has a similar #fb plugin or the ability to import all of your tweets automatically

Conventions

  • #hashtags allow people to tweet on a common searchable topic, especially useful for conferences for combining posts. There is nothing to setup, just announce your hash tag to the attendees.
  • @replies allows you to reply to someone and get their attention (and tell others your message is directed at them more specifically)
  • RT @re-tweets allow you to re-tweet someones idea but you wish to credit them for it as well as highlight to them you like their idea

Twitter API

Twitter Ettiquette & Ideas

  • In general, for business, follow legitimate users that follow you (ignore spam followers). This is less so for personal users, follow who you have interest in
  • Following somebody does not mean you endorse them
  • Auto replies to new users is not recommended, it is just useless spam
  • Locking updates is not recommended, if you want to lock your ideas write a journal in a pad with a lock
  • Replying and retweeting is recommended when it makes sense
  • Retweeting introduces your followers to new followers as well as crediting the original source
  • Clients make it much easier to manage Twitter over the basic website by automating functions and managing searches

I then followed up with a few real examples. The key takeaway is that the attendees need to get in and try out using the tool on their own accounts before tweeting on behalf of the organisation. It is much easier to understand Twitter just by using it.

Different perspectives of Twitter

Today I got invited to a meeting where some of my colleagues were trying to map out their approach to using Twitter as a marketing tool for a spin-off venture they are re-launching. They had all seen Twitter and all have all setup their own accounts and understand about the 140 character limit, @replies and re-tweets. However, what was hard to explain was the difference between the logged in and public views of Twitter.

You see, if you look at somebody’s Twitter account publicly, you only see their tweets, not their @replies and certainly not the updates of those they are following. But, if you are logged into your own account, you obviously see your update, your replies plus the updates from all of those you are following. And as this is the view most people see once they are in the Twitterverse, it can be hard to describe the difference to those that are new to this world.

Given that the Twitter account they were discussing is for a venture, meaning that my colleagues would only be logging in when creating tweets, it then begs the question of who this account should follow. Being a venture, following those legitimate users who follow them seems to make sense. It makes less sense, however, to follow experts in their domain, given that nobody will actually be looking at the follower stream. Furthermore, Twitter only supports one user being logged in as a time (it was never really designed for teams to be tweeting).

The best they can do now is start to use their personal twitter accounts more and get used to the way Twitter works. The rest will then make sense.