Episode 74: Visual Mojo with Lynne Cazaly

The Agile Revolution Podcast

lynnecazalyLive at Agile Australia 2014, Craig and Renee talk all things visual with one of Australia’s top visual facilitators, Lynne Cazaly:

  • What is Visual Facilitation and Graphic Recording
  • You can use visuals even if you can’t draw
  • Lynne’s story into Visual Facilitation
  • How to anchor emphasized words
  • The benefit of a chisel tip
  • The girl who played with paper presentation at Agile Australia 2014
  • Tools that are useful – the good ol’ finger, brushes, procreate, sketches, inkflow, sketchclub
  • The benefit of bringing people up to speed with visual stories
  • To split or not to split – facilitation and the visual scribe
  • Turning your back on the room – a no go or a load of tripe?
  • Preparation – to spend time upfront or not, using templates
  • Facilitation through lean coffee wall (gather, sort, do)
  • Using visuals to engage and distill information for future visibility
  • Lynne’s next course in Melbourne…

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AAFTT Workshop 2011 (Salt Lake City)

Agile AllianceThe Agile Alliance Functional Testing Tools Workshop (AAFTT), held the day before the Agile 2011 conference in Salt Lake City, was once again one of the highlights of the conference. Organised by Jennita Andrea and Elisabeth Hendrickson, it was as always a wide variety of participants with a passion for testing and testing tools. Here are my notes from the day held on August 7, 2011.

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011


Energy Kickoff & Networking

The session was facilitated by Ainsley Nies, and all of the official session notes are stored on the AAFTT wiki: http://aaftt.agilealliance.org:8080/display/AAFTT/agile2011.

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

We started the day with some networking and sharing some areas of passion. Some of these included:

The theme of the AAFTT is: “Advancing the state of the art and the practice of Acceptance Test Driven Development”.

From AAFTT 2011

Ainsley started walking the circle to explain the day and how open space works, but frankly it make me feel a little dizzy! She went on to explain that Harrison Owen invented the open space idea as he noticed the real content at conferences was the passionate conversations. The rules of open space are:

  • whoever shows up are the right people
  • do not hang on to pre-conceived ideas
  • it starts when it starts
  • discussion does not need to be over until it’s over
  • wherever it happens is the right place
From AAFTT 2011

The law of mobility and responsibility (also known as the law of two feet) is if you are not learning or contributing where you are, go some place where you will. Also, butterflies and bumblebees cross pollinate ideas.

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

Finally, we were warned to be prepared to be surprised.

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

Developers are testers and testers are developers – how do we dissolve and combine the roles 

This was the first session that I attended.

From AAFTT 2011
  • there are two mindsets – offence and defence, testers are defence
  • job is not to find defects but to prevent defects – build quality in
  • define quality and what does it mean to us
  • startups don’t often have the problem – multiple skills required
  • what is the biggest impediment – are we missing the skill
  • there is no team of quality anymore – drive quality through the organization
  • functional testers tend to exploratory test and drive from the UI, technical analysts tend to multiple-skill
  • you need to have a team focus and a product focus
  • don’t start with practices but start with a common vision (eg. zero defects)
  • fear of losing identity if you dissolve roles
  • understanding the historical roles sometimes helps understands why things are the way they are
  • need time – Lisa Crispin mentioned that in her company they were going out of business because the system was not good quality, so management were smart to support the initiative
  • helps if everybody on the team has experienced the entire value chain and needs to understand the value of everybody’s piece of the chain – tendency to optimise the piece of the chain you understand
  • developers often underestimate the precision of data and scenarios and developers underestimate the difficulty of some requests
  • personality issues often get in the way
  • mostly about having the right people – need to let some people go
  • we assign labels to roles which create barriers – break down on teams but need to break down at the HR level
  • payroll is also an issue – need to compensate for people taking on more responsibility
  • need to put queue limits on the testing queue to drive behaviours
  • pairing with developer if they do not understand the scenarios
  • some people have the questioning mindset, some have the practical focus – need both to make sure you ship a quality product
  • mini waterfall problem – long tail feedback loop, change workflow that developer needs to work with tester, avoid lean batching problem
From AAFTT 2011

ATDD Patterns

Jennitta Andrea led this session about the work so far in this space:

Last Mile Tools

Elisabeth Hendricksen led this session on tools that are attempting to solve the problem at the last mile.

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011
  • NUnitLiz Keogh – were using Fitnesse but added another level of complication, wrote a DSL that separates tests to make it easier read, WiPFlash is the automation tool, examples are on the website, can call the fixtures from another testing tool like Fitnesse, capture scenarios on a wiki first to get the best out of the automation tool
From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011
  • SpecFlow – Christian Hassa – similar to Cucumber, scenarios written as steps that are bound to execution, uses Gherkin parser (this is a plus as a number of tools use this)
  • SpecLog – maps of your product backlog, capture results of collaboration with the business (Jeff Patton’s story maps), data stored in a single file, stories are initially mapped to a feature file but ultimately get linked to a feature tree
  • SpecRun is under development currently, not bound to SpecFlow or test runner/execution, currently Windows only
From AAFTT 2011
  • Limited RedJoseph Wilk – uses the probability of failure to run those tests first in Cucumber, can then get failure statistics at a feature level, working on a refactoring tool at the moment
  • Relish – publish Cucumber features to a website
From AAFTT 2011
  • The Smallest Federated WikiWard CunninghamJSON for data scrubbing, thin columns to display well on mobile, refactoring is the number one edit so allow it to drag and drop refactor, fit for any analytic or outcome-oriented endeavor, sponsored by Nike, under very early development, meant to take spreadsheet data to the next level
From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

Business Rules

Mary Gorman led this discussion.

From AAFTT 2011
  • business rules – conference website has rules, such as group pack for 5 registrations, what happens to the sixth person, what if someone pulls out
  • need to capture these to describe what our system does
  • business rules manifesto – Mary gives a copy to everyone she work with
  • separation of concerns – a rule is separate from the action which makes the process more brittle and more difficult to test
  • rules are a form of requirements and live beyond the building
  • one process is to extract the rules of a legacy system and then the regression tests – code archaeology
  • the business does not always know the rules of the system or how they got there – rules get added to the system over time or evolve and documentation is unlikely to get updated
  • one insurance company had spent $100 million dollars to bring in a business rule engine, returned investment in two years due to being able to be able to look for conflicting rules
  • put analysis of rules in the hands of developers for way too long
  • simplest part of business rules is having a glossary
  • rules engine enables our rules in productions, and use examples to ensure the engine works correctly
  • testing could look like this – given this data when these rules are applied then I expect this output
  • you need both rules and examples to test them – you need enough examples for now, need to be different paths, decision points, infliction points rather than different values
  • examples are not as expressive as arithmetic, but they are not as understandable
  • lots of rules that we do not think of as business rules because they are baked into the process eg. security access, database schemas
  • “business logic is not” (Martin Fowler)
  • you can’t read English as if it were rules, so we need to use examples
  • the worst systems are the ones that do not have a manual override, humans are usually the best at determining this
  • lots of business rules change due to jurisdiction
  • something will always fall to the bottom – rules need to be valued on risk and value – where is the tipping rule
  • rules are the expression of intent
  • Mars issue – crashed, six week window too costly to fix
  • guts to keep it simple – reporting system (Ward Cunningham) – resisted urge to put in a formula system, wait for requests from users, got 6 requests, sold system based on simplicity of the system
From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

Other Sessions

As with any conference, there are always sessions you would have liked to have got along to.

Richard Lawrence led a discussion on Static Analysis for Gherkin which turned into a discussion on design patterns for Cucumber.

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

George Dinwiddie led a discussion about conversations between roles:

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

My mate Jason Montague led a session on Building Conditions Conducive for ATDD Adoption.

From AAFTT 2011
From AAFTT 2011

Closing Circle

We shared some takeaways in the closing circle, he were some that stood out at me:

From AAFTT 2011
  • issues with dealing of people was a theme
  • what are good ways to express a large amount of test data
  • challenge to get corporations over the hump to release data, plus have good tests and examples around the rules
  • testing needs to be a nation, not just a community
  • it’s time we got more respect in our organisations, it’s time we show more respect to those we work with
  • teams need to dependent on the production of the build
  • federated wikis could help solve the test ownership problem

As for me, my comment was the day had renewed my energy again. ATDD is hard, and as a community we need to try harder.

Podcast

Finally, I recorded a short audio podcast for The Agile Revolution wrapping up AAFTT.

Episode 2: Squeeze your revolutionist today

The Agile Revolution Podcast

SqueezeA fun filled podcast presented by Craig, Tony and Renee covering the following topics:

Quotes:

“I don’t program software anymore, I program people”

TheAgileRevolution-2 (43 minutes)

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Agile Australia 2011 Day 1 Review

Agile Australia 2011Agile Australia 2011 was held for its third year last week at the Hilton in Sydney. Once again I was honoured to be offered an opportunity to present, be an MC for speaker sessions on both days, moderate a panel discussion and run the end of conference retrospective. The conference attracted 675 attendees and the buzz over the two days indicated to me that the conference was a huge success.

For the second year, it was a great pleasure to be one of the conference advisors. As the conference was brought forward to June, there was only six months to prepare between conferences and lots of suggestions and improvements to implement from previous years. A lot of review, debate and discussion went into putting the program together and ensuing there was a good mix of speakers, variety of topics and sessions for different levels of expertise. More effort was also put into shepherding speakers. A huge thank you needs to go to Rachel Slattery and Zhien-U Teoh from Slattery IT for their commitment to the conference as well as my fellow conference advisors Phil Abernathy, Adam Boas, Keith Dodds, Martin Kearns, Dave Thomas and Nigel Dalton.

The following are my notes from the sessions I attended on the first day.

Keynote: On Beyond Agile – The New Face of Software Engineering

Alistair Cockburn delivered this keynote, the slides are available here.

From Agile Australia 2011
  • agile software development is for wimps
  • cooperative game – invention, communication and decision making
  • projects are in a position, look for strategies to move our position, no fixed formula for winning the game (competitors and the economy are some of the enemies), only three moves to invent, communicate and decide
  • communication – whiteboard discussion provides stickiness over time (can just point back to conversation) as well as proximity
  • need about 3 minutes of video to enhance the distributed conversation, becomes archived documentation to remember user point of view or architect design decisions
  • craft – a lot has changed, software development changes every 5-10 years and you need to keep up
  • people learn skills in 3 stages – shu, ha and ri
  • work in progress is decisions that have been made but have not been shipped and delivered
  • like lean we we want multiple deliveries per day – continuous integration has evolved to continuous delivery
  • in decision making, look for the bottlenecks, the person with the full inbox is the person limiting the work in progress of the whole organisation
  • knowledge acquisition – real moment of learning often happens at the end when the surprise factor occurs when we deliver work, suggest that at the beginning of a project deliver a knowledge curve ahead of the cost curve (a number of small experiments)
  • agile says deliver highest level of business value first but projects tend to always deal with the risks first – learn about your business risk (should we build it), social risk (do we have the right people), technical risk (API’s, performance, architecture), cost/schedule risk (gain knowledge about the solidity of the estimates) – you need to decide whether to deliver business values or knock off some of these risks
  • need to identify the tail to determine whether we deliver business value early or add more features later (Apple are good at this, for example shipping an iPad without 3G initially)
  • self awareness – the team is self aware when the team can talk about the team and where they are

Keynote – Is Business Ready for Agile

Rob Thomsett delivered this keynote, his slides are available here. He advised that he was going to run his talk in two sprints and check the heart beat halfway

From Agile Australia 2011
  • agile is a church of all people – the newbies through to the true believers and a few drooling old people
  • agile is not new – been going for 40 years
  • is business ready for agile? – yes and no – every company in the world is ready for agile, they just don’t know it – how do we develop agile into a broader organisational paradigm
  • we work on a set of models that were developed when the world was relatively stable
  • the average window of stability for an organisation is about 3 months, change is normal and everything changes
  • old business techniques have reached their use by date (Gary Hamel – Management 2.0)
  • 100% of C-level executives believe that project management is too bureaucratic, projects take too long, business cases are poorly developed, transparency is adequate, they expect to be ambushed, steering committees are a waste of time, reports are not accurate
  • in 1968/69 NATO held a conference to address a perceived crisis in software engineering – sound familiar?
  • software is not engineering, wrong paradigm, it is a craft
  • the closest to what we do is not making buildings but making movies
  • summary: we took the wrong model, flogged it to death so let’s throw it out
  • agile is a cultural and disruptive journey – first question to ask is are you up for the cultural challenge, for every company that says no there is one that says yes
  • business approach needs to pass the simple and transparent test – most powerful test to clean up broken processes
  • go back to work and annoy people by asking people if we can make it simpler
  • cultural values are openness, honesty, courage, trust and money
  • the people at the top are the easiest folks to get on board with agile
  • most people link budgeting to estimating – agile demands we move money around more quickly
  • sponsors must get dirty – they must be part of the process because they own it
  • PMO should exist for resourcing, not reporting

Panel – The Changing Role of the CIO

Beverley Head moderated this panel with Jeff Smith from Suncorp, Steve Coles from Allianz, Daniel Oertli from REA Group and John Sullivan from Jetstar.

From Agile Australia 2011
  • key is to turn decision making over to employees and leaders need to become coaches and create a great environment
  • The Corner Office by Adam Bryant gives advice for success – passionate curiosity, battle hardened confidence, team smarts, simplicity, fearlessness
  • role is to understand where the company is going and deliver things for them to succeed
  • relax the old techniques like governance that gave a veneer of confidence
  • need to understand and remove the barriers by becoming an active listener
  • fundamentals like attract and retain the best have not changed
  • learn the business in which you operate and realise the definition of leadership has changed (don’t be afraid to higher smarter people than you)
  • need clarity of purpose, avoid constraint of thought and don’t filter based on your experience
  • resistance at the frozen layer – middle managers are typically the blockers so need to change the communication structure (for example, using Yammer for communication to give everyone an equal voice)
  • distributed teams always need a local decision point like an iteration manager
  • leaders need to eliminate information handlers
  • offshoring value proposition – you need to decide if your assets are a strategic advantage, do not offshore things that are volatile or if the project is too big to handle yourself (which essentially means you can’t explain it to someone else), offshoring is good because it keeps us on our toes to be competitive and continuously improve
  • need to look at outsourcing from a productivity point of view and not just a cost point of view (we are not buying pencils)
  • life long learning for developers – people have to follow their own course, inject talent and different thinking, look back each year and think about what you added to your bag of tricks
  • most people are capable of learning new skills, that’s the beauty of human beings
  • what does quality mean – quality is something that is fit for purpose and testable and maintainable, quality is everything
  • pushing agile into the business – need to agree on one way of working, once you are successful people want to jump on the bandwagon

Agile Architecture & Design

I had the privilege to introduce Neal Ford for this presentation, and his slides are available here. As I had seen many parts of this presentation previously, I did not take many notes as they can be found across other posts on this blog.

From Agile Australia 2011
  • in the software world we deal with known unknowns
  • spikes are your friends, purely informational gathering
  • ckjm – tool for reporting complexity and coupling
  • don’t pay for technical debt that you may never justify

Key Metrics for an Agile Organisation

It was my pleasure to introduce Craig Langenfeld from Rally Software to deliver this presentation (originally scheduled to be presented by Mark Ortega). The slides are available here.

From Agile Australia 2011
  • cumulative flow – look at the top of the line to see what is the scope and how has it changed (total features), then ask if the team limits their work in progress by looking at the time between the boundary of in progress swim lanes, finally look at the lead times and how long it will take to deliver a feature
  • work in progress limits allow the team to move through work more effectively
  • lead and cycle time report – allows you to see where your bottlenecks are
  • stop focussing on the workers and focus on the work product – so rather than lines of code look at the the value delivered
  • productivity – understand your teams velocity, throughout mapping stories that were completed and carried over
  • earned value – useful to measure how much value we are delivering (the difference in agile is we are actually delivering the value)
  • predictability – answering the question of when we will be done – throughput chart can show you if a team is getting more predictable over time, burn up is used to show predictability of meeting scope, release burndown to show meeting a date and demonstrate additional scope being added
  • use cumulative flow to track the cone of uncertainty
  • quality – defect trends and counts, most code altered, number of changes, etc…
  • net promoter score for tracking customer satisfaction and if it is increasing
  • get customers to vote on what aspects of the product they like and don’t like
  • for cloud computing track the features that are actually used

Leading by Serving

Simon Bristow delivered this presentation, his slides are available here.

From Agile Australia 2011
  • a perfect team is one that can do anything, in control, do anything thrown at them
  • lots of teams act in an agile manner, the leader makes the difference
  • Robert Greenleaf – The Servant As Leader – others highest priority needs are being served first
  • bridge the gap – gaps when making a decision which is the unknowns, bridges the gap to the future by seeing the unseeable
  • one action at a time
  • forcing a decision on someone will engender resistance, some you must persuade – need to listen to connect at the grass roots level
  • withdraw and acceptance – step back from the team to allow them to look after themselves and accept that the team know best as they are the subject matter experts and will get the job done
  • facilitate community – need to build
  • lead using art not science – if you turn to science in agile you will turn to process

Soldering Irons, Consumer Devices and Hardware Manufacturing in the world of Agile Software

Dean Netherton and Neil Brydon for DiUS delivered this talk which was one of the highlights of the conference for me. The slides are available here.

From Agile Australia 2011
  • DiUS working on a fire danger smart meter and technology for charging electric cars
  • how do you demonstrate value when haven’t built the device?
  • had to work around the vendor for the smart meter because they had a traditional process for building the device – aligned project plans around hardware drops and had to simulate the hardware in many cases
  • used wireframes to drive design but had to spend longer on design to ensure it was right – for example, can’t add a bigger battery later
  • first drop was an off the shelf component board to kick start the software
  • second drop was a bare board that was the basic board without the LCD
  • third drop was the plastics without the screen as the component had not arrived so replaced with paper
  • challenge on how to articulate stories – had to break stories own technically
  • used Cucumber to test as there was an embedded USB port on the board – helped embedded engineers assist the Ruby engineers understand how the device worked
  • did continuous integration by plugging a device into the build server, had an issue about flashing the device when the code changes
  • hardware engineers slightly change the design with each revision which had affects on software design as well as having hardware for continuous integration
  • built own hardware prototypes and used local suppliers to cut down lead times (China cheaper but added 6-7 weeks to the lead time)
  • used mocking to show users the idea ahead of hardware being available
  • planned for multiple hardware revisions to allow for late decisions
  • these days you can send a 3D model to a design house and they can pop out a prototype, design exercise ensures that screws line up, etc
  • no excuses for automated testing, in the past it was not embraced in hardware, can test the integration layer without the need for hardware
  • no benefit in running tests for the hardware design as you only get a handful of drops
  • use automated test to ensure buttons and light work, good when you get new hardware and good for checking faults on the production line
  • had to learn about the hardware stack early on which challenged whether value was being added
  • firmware development not integrated onto the story wall
  • technical tasks are OK but really understand what done is
  • luckily the stakeholders were quite technical

Putting It All Together – Agile Transformation and Development Tooling

Philip Chan from IBM delivered this presentation, his slides are available here. I failed to see a lot of agile in this talk personally.

  • established teams – communication difficult across timezones but tools make it easy, different tools used in different teams,
  • IBM agile process – 2 week iterations, 2 day inter sprint break every 4 weeks, develop for first 6 days followed by 2.5 days for bug fixing, do acceptance testing for first 6 days and 2.5 days of exploratory testing, showcase on day 9
  • test management very waterfall for audit purposes
  • using automated tests and continuous integration to assist global team optimise processes

Panel – Continuous Delivery

Evan Bottcher, Neal Ford and Martin Fowler from ThoughtWorks were on this panel.

From Agile Australia 2011
  • continuous integration – everyone in the team integrates with the mainline at least once a day
  • continuous delivery is taking the same approach as continuous integration and apply it to the last mile – decision to deploy should be business only with no technical barriers
  • continuous deployment is continually delivering on a regular basis – continuous delivery enables this if you want it
  • rare to find a company that is pulling in the same direction, so you need to automate in pockets and add manual checkpoints and then you can look for ways to automate them
  • risks – need to bring pain forward, which was the tenet of XP, not doing it is much more risky, there is pain and effort to setup, you need to look for a leverage point in your production systems to justify
  • if you do something rarely you don’t get practice, by doing it more often you improve which actually results in a process that is more auditable and gives you more confidence
  • is a good approach to shorten feedback loops, also allows you to give confidence to the business on delivery timelines
  • packaged software makes continuous delivery hard, important to look at the automation of the configuration as well as automated tests, looking for fast feedback to give confidence in delivery
  • need to push software vendors to make things more deliverable (this was a rant by Martin Fowler, that I tend to agree with)
  • make database changes with the same fundamentals – break them down into small changes and combine schema changes with the data migration and string them together into a package, tools have got more specific like dbdeploy and Liquibase support this and Ruby on Rails just supports this out of the box
  • DBA’s are the final frontier because they like to fiddle with scripts, need to bring them in or deal with smaller changes
  • testers tied to manual processing – need to separate the low and high value testing work, fear that they will be replaced by a small shell script, will make their job vastly easier, need to get buy in by demonstration
  • difficulty is always the human element – testers are moved from the backend to the front end of the process, specification by example at the front now, need to look at incentives and make them common between developers and testers
  • key is a business decision of when to delay so you can deal with business change, training, etc…
  • people are now used to the fact that websites or apps on their phones are continuously changing
  • gives the option to deploy to different types of users when they need it
  • Go was built with continuous delivery in mind, version control systems are critical because everything needs to be in there, automated testing tools are also critical, continuous integration servers can help if they have an extra build pipelines
  • Puppet and Chef both allow you to script your environments
  • need to place people in teams who believe things are possible

Other Stuff

At the end of a very long day, it was good to network with attendees at the ThoughtWorks open office.

Also, I have to send congratulations to my colleague Adrian Smith from Ennova on his talk Agile for Startups which I hear was very well received (I have attended previous incarnations of this talk).

AAFTT Workshop 2009 (Chicago)

Agile AllianceI had the great pleasure to attend the Agile Alliance Functional Testing Tools (AAFTT) workshop on the Sunday before the Agile 2009 conference in Chicago, and share discussion with some of the best minds in the testing community from around the world.

The location was right across the road from the Willis Tower (better known by its previous name, the Sears Tower). Some of the notable attendees amongst many others included:

There were at least 4 tracks to choose from, these are the notes from the ones I participated in.

Screencasting

Small group discussion led by Jason Huggins about a different way of thinking about test artefacts (basically producing an iPhone commercial)

Photo 3 of 4 from #agile2009 in Chicago at the pre-conference... on Twitpic

  • the Rails screencast sold Rails because it sold the idea and then the product sold itself
  • now, with YouTube, etc, we have the tools available
  • used to be RTFM, not it is WTFV
  • ideal is to produce automated tests like the iPhone commercial, instead of a test report
  • use the “dailies” concept, like in the movies
  • perhaps the movie should be at a feature level, because the video should be interesting
  • best suited for happy path testing, is a way to secure project funding and money, remember that the iPhone commercial does not show the AT&T network being down
  • there is a separation between pre-project and during testing
  • tools currently exist, including the Castanaut DSL
  • part of the offering of Sauce Labs, currently recording Selenium tests
  • from the command line utility vnc2swf, created an API called Castro
  • at the moment you need to clean up the screens that are recorded
  • the advantage, being VNC, is that you can use all sorts of hardware, including the iPhone
  • suggest that you use something like uLimit to stop runaway videos, especially when being run in an automated test, to limit the size of the directory or the length of the video
  • suggest make a rule that no test is longer than five minutes
  • given the current tools are written in Python, DocTest is good for testing

Lightning Talks on Tools

I came in mid-way through this session, but caught some of the tools being discussed at the end

  • some tools are too hard to get passed the basic level, but quick to setup
  • tests are procedural, engineers tend to over-engineer

Robot IDE (RIDE)

  • most tools have a basic vocabulary to overcome
  • IDE is worth looking at
  • Robot has a Selenium plugin, but it is easy to write your own framework

Twist

  • specify tests as requirements, looks like a document, stored as text, write whatever you want
  • refactoring support as a first level concept
  • out of the box support for Selenium and Frankenstein (Swing)
  • write acceptance test – brown shows not implemented, allows developer to know what to implement, turns blue when done
  • refactoring concept “rephrase”
  • supports business rule tables (ie. Fitnesse for data driven tests)
  • support to mark a test as manual and generate the same reports
  • commercial software, licenced in packs
  • plugins to Eclipse, but don’t need to be familiar with this unless you are developing the automation

WebDriver

  • been around for three years

UltiFit

  • Ultimate Software, internal currently, allows to select Fitnesse tests, setup and teardown, close browser windows, nice GUI, etc…
  • uses TestRunner under the covers

SWAT

  • been around for two years, more traction now that Lisa Crispin works for Ultimate Software
  • simple editor for SWAT (& somewhat Fitnesse)
  • has a database access editor
  • uses Fitnesse syntax
  • there is a recorder, only good for teaching, people get lazy and don’t refactor
  • can take screenshots, borrowed from WatiN
  • can’t run SWAT when Fitnesse is running as a server
  • SWAT is a C# library at its core
  • can run macros, tests from other tests
  • run script – write script (eg. JavaScript) to help things that are hard to test

High Performance Browser Testing / Selenium

Jason Huggins led this conversation which was more a roundtable debate than anything else. The group discussed how we can get tests running quicker and reduce feedback times considerably.

This discussion led to a couple of the quotes of the workshop from Jason Huggins:

  • “Selenium IDE is the place to start with Selenium, but it is Selenium on training wheels”
  • “Record/playback testing tools should be clearly labeled as “training wheels”
  • “What to do with the Selenium IDE, no self respecting developer will use it.” Thinking of renaming the IDE to Selenium Trainer.
  • Amazing how many people in the testing community are red, green colour blind”

When Can / Do You Automate Too Much?

This started as a discussion on testing led by Brandon Carlson…

  • get your business people to write the tests – they will understand how hard it is, have seen outcome that amount of scope reduced because they have to do the work

…but ended up as a great discussion on agile approaches and rollout, discussing a number of war stories led by Dana Wells and Jason Montague from Wells Fargo

  • still early in their agile deployment
  • wish to emulate some of the good work done by some of the early agile teams
  • estimate in NUTs (Nebulus Units of Time)

Miscellaneous and Other Links

Some other miscellaenous observations from the workshop:

  • a number of sessions were recorded
  • of those using Windows laptops, a large percentage were running Google Chrome
  • Wikispaces is good to setup a quick wiki

A number of posts about the workshop have been posted since including:

And you can view the photos that I took from the event at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/33840476@N06/sets/72157622521200928/