Agile Coaching Exchange: MidTN – Agile Coaching Ethics: The Powerful Questions Behind What, Why & How

ACEMy talk from Agile Coaching Exchange: MidTN called “The Powerful Questions Behind What, Why & How” is available on Slideshare.

In this session we will look into the work that the community is doing as part of the Agile Alliance around Agile Coaching Ethics. We will ask why the work is needed, what has been done so far and what we can do as a community to support this work.

Many thanks to Jessica Katz for inviting me to present this session.

Agility Today 2021 Agile Career Bootcamp – Agile Alliance Knowledge Booth

It was a pleasure to be asked by Deepti Jain to represent the Agile Alliance as part of the Agile Career bootcamp for the Agility Today 2021 festival. The video of the ask me anything session is available on YouTube.

Draft Published of the Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

The Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative has published a draft code of ethics that aims to raise the standards around agile coaching. It runs under the auspices of the Agile Alliance to independently represent the wider agile community.

The January 2021 draft of Code of Ethical Conduct consists of 18 points covering 9 subject areas:

  • Confidentiality and information security
  • Acting within your ability
  • Introspection and continuing professional development
  • Conflicts of interest
  • Social responsibility, including diversity and inclusion
  • Ensuring the relationship is valuable for both coach and the client
  • Agreeing on boundaries
  • Abuse of power
  • Responsibility to the profession

The Ethics Scenarios provide guidance on how the code relates to common challenges experienced by agile coaches, whether they are experienced or new to the role.

The expectation is that anyone taking on agile coaching at any level in an organisation will be able to use this code to help guide their behavior when faced with ethical dilemmas.

For questions and feedback on the code of ethics and the related agile scenarios, you can contact the initiative team at AgileCoachingEthics@agilealliance.org.

InfoQ interviewed Craig Smith and Shane Hastie about the code of ethical conduct.

Source: Draft Published of the Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative – Key Accomplishments & Highlights

The team working on the Agile Alliance Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative has been working steadily over the last six months and we have now published a draft Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

Source: Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative – Key Accomplishments & Highlights

Identifying a Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

Agile_Alliance_Logo_Color-pngThe Agile Alliance Agile Coaching Ethics initiative is developing a code of ethical conduct to raise coaching standards in Agile coaching and amplify the value of the profession.

Source: Identifying a Code of Ethical Conduct for Agile Coaching

The Big Tent of Agility

This post originally appeared on the SoftEd website.

One of the advantages of an Agile way of working is the fact that you can inspect and adapt and find the best tool or practice for the job. Unfortunately, though, when you are learning or looking for guidance, the myriad of frameworks and techniques can make the transformation to a new way of working seem very daunting.  It is therefore no surprise that frameworks that promise to offer a way to make sense of the complexity continue to rise in popularity in organisations all over the world.

If we go back to the roots of Agility and the creation of the Manifesto for Agile Software Development back in 2001, it was a meeting of the people who were the creators of the key approaches and practices at that time – Scrum, Extreme Programming, DSDM, Crystal and Adaptive Software Development amongst others. The key to the Manifesto was that it was written to be framework (and organisation) agnostic and that it captured the key values and principles of agility, to the extent that it is still universally agreed that this document is both the definition and core of Agile. Even the newer interpretations of the basics, such as Modern Agile and Heart of Agile, still borrow heavily on the core.

When I started my Agile journey in the early 2000’s we were still inventing a lot of the practices that we take for granted today. My early experiences were mostly a hybrid of Extreme Programming and Scrum, with a mix of other practices built in and finding the tool for the job and the team at the time. To me, Agile has always been about the core values and principles with a large umbrella of practices and frameworks underneath it. This doesn’t mean that following a framework like Scrum is wrong, it’s just knowing when something more or different is required. This is exactly what led to scaling approaches like LeSS, Scrum At Scale and SAFe and even for Ken Schwaber (one of the creators of Scrum) to define the term “Scrum And“.

One of the great things about Agile and its community is it is a place where ideas can be tried and shared. The Agile Alliance, the non-profit organisation formed out of the Agile Manifesto to promote and bring together the Agile community (of which I am proud to be an active member and current board member and secretary) refers to this as the “the big tent” – a place where any person of idea that subscribes to the values and principles is welcome. This big tent or umbrella was one of inspirations for a conference talk I gave a few years ago called “40 Agile Methods in 40 Minutes” – the visualisation of which has been used widely in the community ever since.

This big tent approach is one of the core reasons I was drawn to working with SoftEd, initially over 10 years ago as a client and customer, then later as a contract trainer and in more recent years as the Global Agility Lead. As one of the world’s leading ICAgile course providers, the suite of world quality courses are based on teaching the “big tent” of agility with a focus on giving attendees the best tools and techniques they need to be successful. The same approach applies to coaching engagements where the focus is on capability uplift and successful outcomes.

There is a myriad of techniques and practices and ways to get support on your Agile journey. If you are looking for training or coaching support that puts a focus on getting the right outcomes rather than a strict adherence to a framework, then make sure you check out the range services that SoftEd has to offer.

We Support the Black Community

We are listening. We are learning.

Agile Alliance stands firmly and wholeheartedly in support of the Black community, and in the ongoing fight for racial justice and equity around the world. Racial injustice has no place in our organization and our community.

As we are committed to supporting people who explore and apply Agile, valuing “individuals and interactions” is at the core of what we do. This idea goes beyond our work in software — it’s the basis of human dignity itself.

Source: We Support the Black Community

Agile2020 Will Not Move Online

After much reflection, the Agile Alliance Board of Directors has made the very difficult decision that Agile2020 — the largest annual global gathering of Agile practitioners — will not be reshaped into a virtual conference. We are unable to replicate the premier international event for the advancement of Agile software development in an online environment and foster the immersive experience that attendees from more than 50 countries treasure year after year.

Source: Agile2020 Will Not Move Online

Agile2020 Update

The Agile Alliance Board of Directors has unanimously decided that the physical Agile2020 conference cannot take place. Our first priority is the health and safety of all. Our mission has not changed and we are exploring avenues for the Agile community to share the program that has been recently announced. We don’t yet know what that looks like. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate this new reality.

Source: Agile2020 Update