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Episode 75: Agile Expedition with Alan Bustamante

Originally posted on The Agile Revolution:

alanbustamanteAt Agile 2013 in Nashville on a park bench, in a garden, near a waterfall that is ever present, Craig catches up with Alan Bustamante to talk about his Agile expedition. Along the way they chat about:

  • the enormity of the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville and the average weather outside
  • the use case approach in the Rational Unified Process (RUP) and how it set the scene for Scrum and Agile
  • bringing architects along for the Agile journey
  • an initial lure for Agile – “the pressure of letting the team down is greater than staying resistant”
  • Agile Cincinnati and the take up in Cincinatti and Colombus
  • the need to “get back to making work fun and building relationships”
  • Alan’s work at Seapine Software and “The Agile Expedition” book
  • Alan’s conference tip: make it a goal to meet at least one person and get to know them
  • Advice: “there are bigger…

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Repairing a Corrupted Mac OSX ExFAT Partition

ExFATI run a MacBook Pro Retina (late 2013) and on my 512GB hard drive I have 3 partitions

  • 150GB Mac OSX partition (currently running Mavericks)
  • 150GB Windows 8.1 partition (via Bootcamp)
  • 200GB data parition (formatted with ExFAT)

I chose an ExFAT partition so I could read and write to the data partition from either the OSX or the Windows partition as I use each operating system a similar amount. I had planned to install VMWare fusion at some point to avoid the dual boot, but haven’t sone so due to some licencing issues with some software on my Windows partition that I uncovered in the trial.

Recently I was travelling and was doing some editing for my podcast on the plane. I also inadvertantly moved and deleted some files. The next morning I woke up to deliver a workshop to find that my data partition was missing. Windows reported that the drive needed to be formatted and Mac OSX reported that the drive was corrupt. On either operating system, the relevant disk utilities were unable to fix the issue.

It appears that ExFAT partitions are not well supported in OSX, particularly if you delete files. Unfortunately due to Windows and Mac not playing nicely from a read/write perspective, neither HFS or NTFS are an option for this drive either.

A bunch of articles seemed to indicate that CHKDSK /F on the volume should fix it, but given the fact that Windows was reporting the partition needed to be formatted, this fix was not valid in this circumstance. After searching the web for numerous reports and fixes (and tearing my hair out with worry in the process), I finally stumbled on an article that led to a simple solution of a terminal command:

fsck_exfat -d disk0s4

where diskos4 is your ExFAT partition.

It then asks:

Main boot region needs to be updated. Yes/No?

to which you reply Yes. You can then run repair in the OSX Disk Utility and the partition should be restored!

Easy fix, but baffles me why ExFAT and NTFS support is so bad on Mac OSX.

Episode 74: Visual Mojo with Lynne Cazaly

Originally posted on The Agile Revolution:

lynnecazalyLive at Agile Australia 2014, Craig and Renee talk all things visual with one of Australia’s top visual facilitators, Lynne Cazaly:

  • What is Visual Facilitation and Graphic Recording
  • You can use visuals even if you can’t draw
  • Lynne’s story into Visual Facilitation
  • How to anchor emphasized words
  • The benefit of a chisel tip
  • The girl who played with paper presentation at Agile Australia 2014
  • Tools that are useful – the good ol’ finger, brushes, procreate, sketches, inkflow, sketchclub
  • The benefit of bringing people up to speed with visual stories
  • To split or not to split – facilitation and the visual scribe
  • Turning your back on the room – a no go or a load of tripe?
  • Preparation – to spend time upfront or not, using templates
  • Facilitation through lean coffee wall (gather, sort, do)
  • Using visuals to engage and distill information for future visibility
  • Lynne’s next course in Melbourne…

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Episode 73: What Made You An Agile Coach?

Originally posted on The Agile Revolution:

AgileCoachTony asks a philisophical question , whilst Renee harnesses her nineties pop star – Ice Ice Baby and Craig marvels at Tony’s  cool intro – probably the coolest intro he’s done since the eighties.

The Agile Revolution – 73 (54.21)

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Repairing Outlook 2010 Auto Complete Cache

Outlook2010The auto complete cache in Outlook remembers all of the addresses that you have emailed and auto completes them when you enter an email address into the To: (or CC: or BCC:) field in Outlook. There are numerous fixes around on the web, but this one sorted the issue for me today on a stubborn Windows 7 machine with Outlook 2010 installed (with Google App Sync).

  1. Close Outlook and go to %localappdata%\Microsoft\Outlook\ and rename RoamCache to old_RoamCache
  2. Restart Outlook using the command line switch /cleanautocompletecache (“C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office14\Outlook.exe” /cleanautocompletecache). This will rebuild the autocomplete cache.

These steps are based on an article at Spiceworks here: http://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/show/16443-repair-autocomplete-cache-in-outlook-2010. The second step was missing in the official Microsoft article.

2013 WordPress Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 11,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 4 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Agile Encore 2013: Visual Management: Leading With What You Can See

AgileEncore2013My presentation from the Agile Encore 2013 conference called “Visual Management: Leading With What You Can See” is available on Slideshare.

Renee Troughton was unfortunately unable to join me to present this reprise of the talk we presented together at Agile Australia 2013.

Using task boards or story walls is a key Agile practice, but are you making the most of it? Visual Management is more than just putting cards on a wall, it is a growing style of management that focuses on managing work only by what you can see rather than reports or paper being shuffled around. Visual Management allows you to understand the constraints in the system, mitigate risks before they become issues, report on progress from the micro to the macro. Visual Management can also be used to demonstrate to customers and clients where the work they care about is at. This presentation is all about taking the management of your work to the next stage of transparency. Discover:

* How to identify when your story wall isn’t telling you everything and how to adjust it
* What the three different types of story walls are and which one is more suitable to certain circumstances
* Different ways to visualise your product backlogWhy queue columns and limiting work in progress is so important regardless of whether you are using Scrum or Kanban
* How symbols and tokens can be used to give more information
* What else can you use other than story walls to visualise information
* How to ingrain Visual Management into both the team and management structures of your organisation
* Visualising Your Quality, Testing and Team
* What is systemic flow mapping and why is it important

Unfortunately the talk was interrupted about three-quarters of the way through by a rogue video conference call into the auditorium. My attempt to try and answer questions why people were trying to fix the problem were interrupted by audio coming through the call. We soldiered on – but it interrupted the flow.

And here are some feedback from the feedback forms – much appreciated!

  • Lots of ideas
  • Very informative with real world examples
  • Delivered as per advertised. Was relevant and interesting to listen to. Some great take outs
  • More relevant to where we are as an organisation
  • Big wall
  • Most applicable as I am a newbie
  • Kept the audience engaged from start to finish
  • The task based techniques most relevant
  • Gave more understanding of how to do better Agile

 

Video

Meals Per Hour

A great video demonstrating how Lean principles can be applied to everyday life, such as disaster relief or non-profits.

And kudos to Toyota for sharing their knowledge for charity.

Agile 2013: 7 Deadly Sins of Agile Software Test Automation

Agile2013_Speaker_bannerMy presentation from the Agile 2013 conference called “ 7 Deadly Sins of Agile Software Test Automation” is available on Slideshare.

Adrian Smith was unfortunately unable to join me to present this extended version of the talk that he has presented previously at Agile Australia and Fusion.

Automated software testing is a key enabler for teams wanting to build high quality software that can be progressively enhanced and continuously released. To ensure development practices are sustainable, automated testing must be treated as a first-class citizen and not all approaches are created equal. Some approaches can accumulate technical debt, cause duplication of effort and even team dysfunctions.

The seven deadly sins of automated software testing are a set of common anti-patterns that have been found to erode the value of automated testing resulting in long term maintenance issues and ultimately affecting the ability of development teams to respond to change and continuously deliver.

Taking the classic seven sins (Gluttony, Sloth, Lust, Envy, Rage, Pride, Greed) as they might be applied to test automation we will discuss how to identify each automated sin and more importantly provide guidance on recommended solutions and how to avoid them in the first place.

A full house for the talk, some really positive feedback and heaps of questions following the talk, so thanks to everyone who attended!

And here are the comments from the feedback cards that were handed in and nothing negative!:

  • Great speaker, am so glad I came here
  • Excellent slides, pictures
  • Very humorous – kept me awake!
  • Super content, gave me some great ideas to take back to my workplace. THANKYOU!
  • Great analogy, good tips / info
  • By far, the absolute best QA session I have attended this week. I wish my entire company could have heard this presentation. It was engaging, meaningful and practical information that I can take directly back to my colleagues. Well done!
  • Very good session, got a lot out of it – got some good direction, fun presentation
  • Best session I have attended! Great speaker delivering the content in a very entertaining manner
  • Excellent session! Craig is a great speaker, content was SO good! Nice I can go get preso and link to templates and materials
  • Pragmatic testing!! :)
  • Enjoyed the session, this will make me look for other opportunities (tools) for automation testing
  • Great speaker! Although new to testing sessions, I gained good insight from this session to put into use back at the business! :)
  • This was the most insightful and best talk I’ve attended thus far
  • Excellent session

Yehuda Katz on Ember.js (Ninefold Event Brisbane)

ninefoldYehuda Katz is a well respected figure in the Ruby and JS communities, so it was no surprise that it was packed house that turned up to see him last night in Brisbane. And whilst the room was hot, there was a lack of chairs and Yehuda himself was getting frustrated with the feedback and cutoff in the house audio system, it was a great night organised by Nigel Rausch on behalf of the guys at Ninefold.

Here were a couple of items I picked up on his talk on Ember.js:

  • like Ruby and Rails, Ember.js is not optimised for computer science but for developer happiness
  • ambitious app – optimised for building entire applications, long lived applications (like Gmail, lasts on the screen for a very long time) need a sophisticated architecture
  • MVC is not quite enough – model (all sessions), controller (just this session), view (what is currently visible)
  • use HTML and CSS to layout application, is the lingua franca of the web
  • HTML needs more dynamic features – {{ for data binding, # block form in Ember
  • URLs are important – good applications have good URL support – like Twitter or Rdio – primary way that people share information in Twitter and email for example – is the UI of the web, we should use them more universally and use them everywhere

Yehuda then gave a demo. Having not used Ember.js before I was impressed by how easy it was to build URLs and interactivity. I certainly will give it a closer look at some stage.

  • future of the web – take a look at the google project – Polymer
  • evergreen browsers – Chrome started this, once you download the browser that is permission enough to download new versions of the browsers ; Safari has not adopted this and will probably become the next IE6!
  • some good resources include embercasts and Ember 101

There was also an interesting kick off presentation by Toby Hede about some of the cool stuff Ninefold are doing, if for nothing else the animations were amusing!

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